Fatal Accident on The Liverpool and Birmingham Railway 12th September 1837 On Saturday evening the train for Birmingham left Manchester at six o'clock, and proceeded at the rate of 25 miles per hour, as far as the Kenyan Junction Station. Here , unfortunately , was in waiting a train consisting of two coaches from Boston. They were waiting for the Manchester train, and were on the line on which the Birmingham train was approaching. The engineer, from some cause not yet explained, did not slacken his speed, and the result was that he ran into the two Boston coaches. The concussion was terrific. The roof of the coach next the engine was carried away; and a lady who was sat in the inside was killed in an instant. A nurse who had a child on her knees, in her alarm, and in order to save the infants life, flung it out of the coach. Unfortunately it too was killed. These, however were the only deaths the accident occasioned. Several persons were, by the shock, precipitated on the road, and some were more or less injured, but we are happy to say, not so seriously as to prevent their being conveyed to Wigwam, where every attention has been paid to them. This is the first time since the opening of either the Liverpool and Birmingham or the Liverpool and Manchester railways that one train has run into another. The hour being early, and it being clear daylight at the time, a suspicion has arisen that the engineer was not only negligent but was something worse at the time. If report be true, he is of this opinion himself; for it said that he disappeared immediately after the accident, and has not been since heard of. Perhaps this ,however, is only a part of the exaggeration which has magnified, in this town (Liverpool, the extent of the calamity to the loss of a dozen lives.

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Fatal railway accident February 1853, an inquest was held by the County Coroner on the body of William Wilcock of Golborne who was killed the previous Saturday by the express train. A pig he was driving home got on the rail near the station, while he was driving it off he was hit by the express train from Preston which killed him instantly. A verdict of accidental death was passed.

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Fatal railway accident, on the 20 April 1853 Thomas Bailey employed in the goods department for the past 20 years was assisting in shunting waggons off the main line near Leigh Station. He called to James Hunt the driver to back up at the same time as he was passing between the waggons to unhook, he was caught by the buffers and was dreadfully crushed. At the inquest a verdict of accidental death was passed.

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Astley station master Jeremiah Chapman Dooley aged 37 years killed by a train 10 November 1853. He was walking the line to Bury Lane at 11:00 am then returning back to his home. As he had not returned that day, his wife set out to look for him on the following morning and found his body on the line, his head had been completely severed and lay some 12 feet away. It was conjectured that the sleepers that had sunk, and were now raised and packed were responsible for him tripping and banging his head, rendering him unconscious on the line and a train ran over him.

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Accident to a train December 1853 occurred on Barton Moss on the Liverpool Manchester line. A rumour that 3 people had been killed was circulated, but was unfounded. An axle tree of a luggage waggon fractured blocking the line for some hours with overturned and broken waggons.

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Fatal railway Accident 5th August 1856 at Westhoughton station 18 year old John Glaister working for the Lancashire Yorkshire railway rode from Wigan to Westhoughton on top of one of the carriages (uncommon now but once a regular practise) with tools in his charge for plate layers working on the line. During the journey he was in a lying pose, but as the train arrived at Westhoughton station he sprang to his feet, directly afterwards his head came in violent contact with an iron spout which crosses the line at the same height as the station bridge and he fell back on the carriage dead

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Fearful railway accident collision near Wigan 18 February 1860. On Sunday morning about quarter past one the bight up-mail train from Edinburgh to London came into collision with a train of empty coal waggons, at the junction with the Spring Branch Colliery Railway, about two miles from Wigan. The result was the fatal destruction of several coal waggons, the disabling and partial destruction of the engine belonging to the mail train, and much damage to several carriages, and the serious injury of three persons in the train and one of the companies servants at the junction. The mail up-train in question was upwards of an hour and a half behind it's time, and the coal train had been waiting on the down line for the other to pass before  crossing to the junction on the other side. The mail was due at Wigan about 11: 40, at which place it does not stop, but delivers and receives its mail by apparatus. It was almost a quarter past one when it approached the station, which it passed at a great speed, Just previous to that the men in charge of the Spring Junction finding that the down-mail train from London was within a few minutes of being due determined on signalling for the north train to stop, should it approach while they shunted the coal waggons off the down line, so as to allow the mail for the south to pass. While this operation was going on the mail for the north was announced as approaching but, the signals being put on, there was no apprehension of a collision until a few moments of its occurrence. The signal was unobserved by the driver of the engine for he ran direct into the coal train as it was crossing the main line. The engine appears to have struck three or four carriages in succession smashing them into fragments, and then being disabled, and forced off the line, to have fallen on its side. Two or three passenger carriages were also off the lines, and considerably damaged. The passengers however (about halve a dozen including two ladies), escaped without serious injury. The man in charge of the points, John Dobson was knocked about by the fragments of broken waggons, and picked up in an almost senseless state. It was found on examination that his thigh was broken; he had a slight injury on his head, but he soon rallied, so as to be able to be removed with the other injured persons in the guards van to Wigan. One of the companies guards was much cut about the head, and two post office guards were also injured in the same way. The names of the injured parties are John Dobson pointsman; Thomas Picknoll railway guard; David Bennett and William Giles, post office guards. Yesterday they were all getting along satisfactorily buy lexapro online .

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Train Accident At Bolton  A fearful railway accident occurred on the morning of Thursday the 8th August 1857, at the Bolton Station on the Bolton, Leigh and Kenyon branch of the North West Railway. A goods train from Liverpool pulling 32 waggons, 18 of which were loaded with coal and the rest general merchandise, arrived at the Daubhill incline at 6: 30 am covering a distance of one and a quarter miles and terminating at Great Moor Street Station. It was the practise on reaching the slope to cut off the steam and apply the breaks to every waggon. In that instance the steam was shut off, and only some of the breaks applied, but not sufficient to check the imputes of the train, which carried down the incline at a terrific speed. The line was intersected a few hundred yards from the station at Crook Street, the rails being held across the street, and goods trains are shunted on to a siding before they reached the crossing. The passenger trains were then only being taken across Crook Street to the station. The points here were under the control of a porter, and it was customary for freight trains to stop 100 yards before they reached him. Owing to the great speed of the train, he had no opportunity to operate the points and it went on towards the passenger station, with the gates at the crossing being smashed to splinters. There were a number of empty carriages waiting for use at the station, and the train ran into them and drove them completely through the station and on to the street. The buffers were shivered to pieces, and the wall of the ladies waiting room was forced in. Still the train was not arrested, and the foremost carriages were forced through a second wall into the portico on Great Moor Street, and the train was then stopped by the falling of the roof. It was fortunate that only one life was lost, the stoker had left the train before it attained great speed to put on the brakes, about a dozen plate layers were riding on top of the waggons but they jumped off. The engine driver was stooping down and so escaped, but the other man James Royle of Lowton who was standing up, was struck by a beam against the front of the boiler and when extricated he was quite dead.

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Railway Accident at Leigh December 1858 Yesterday morning a painful accident occurred near the Leigh Railway Station to an intelligent youth named Peter Hayes about 14 years who had been for a short time telegraph clerk at the Kenyon Station. The youth resided in Bradshawgate Leigh, going to his employment by the trains. Sometimes to reach Kenyon a little earlier than the first passenger train, he had got on a goods train which passed Leigh about 7 o'clock. He was waiting to do so yesterday morning when he slipped down, one of his legs alighting on the rail just as the goods train approached. It was dreadfully mangled. Medical aid was obtained but the injuries were of so serious a nature, that it was deemed advisable to remove him at once to the Manchester Infirmary.

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Fearful train accident at Leigh November 1860. On Monday morning a fearful accident occurred on the Bolton-Leigh-Kenyon branch of the London & North Western Railway. The goods train that should have left Atherton Station for Liverpool at 2: 30 pm was detained until about 3: 55 pm. After the passenger train which leaves Atherton about 3: 40 pm had passed, a number of plate layers engaged in repairing the permanent rail about a quarter of a mile from Leigh Station, took up a rail not being aware that the goods train was behind time. Before they had time to replace it they saw the goods train descending the incline. The ganger (Samuel Hindley) at once dispatched the signalman to warn those in charge of the train of the danger of approaching. The goods train was a very heavy one, consisting of upwards of 40 waggons and drawn by two engine's., five persons conducted it, of namely two drivers, two stokers and a brakesman. They immediately put on the breaks and reversed the engines, but owing to the slippery nature of the rails from the recent rain the day before, and the weight of the train, it was found impossible to stop. The result was that the first engine on reaching the spot where the first engine was displaced was turned over, the second one turning partly upon it, and the waggons piling up themselves one over th other train completing an enormous pyramid, Richard Higginson driver of the second engine, was killed on the spot, his body being fearfully mangled and lying for several hours beneath the boiler of the engine with the water and steam playing on it. John Elliot and John Valentine driver and stoker of the first  engine finding that there was no chance of escape jumped from the engine, the former sustaining deep lacerations on the upper portion of his leg and had later severe concussion. The other stoker and the brakesman escaped with very little injury. Messrs Brideoak & Son and Evans surgeons of Leigh were properly in attendance. Telegrams were sent for assistance to get men and machines to clear the line and they were soon busy in so doing.

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Railway Accident 3 Dead January 1865 On Saturday afternoon about 2 o'clock an accident occurred resulting in the death of three people near Bolton on the Leigh branch of the London North Western, precisely under the Chip Hill Lane bridge which spans the line between Daubhill and Checkerbent one and a third miles from Bolton and close to Deane Moor. The line is single and being midway between signals, to prevent accidents. On Saturday afternoon the Liverpool train arrived at Checkerbent at 1: 30 pm, passed Daubhill safely and went on to Bolton; that from Tyldesley arrived at Checkerbent at 1: 40 pm and left their with three carriages carrying 12 passengers. Meanwhile a heavy goods train which had shunted into a siding at Daubhill to allow the Liverpool train to pass, proceeded at a pretty quick rate towards Checkerbent. Upon reaching Chip Hill Lane bridge it met the Tyldesley train and running about 20 mph it reached a sudden curve that shuts out the sight of any oncoming train, even from a few yards distance, and not enough time to apply the breaks. A terrific collision was inevitable, the engines respectively with tanks forward shed into each other with a fearful noise and several trucks in the goods train were shred to fragments. One truck was pulled over the preceding one crushing it in its fall, a further three trucks were forced upon each other. The engines sustained considerable damage, the iron plates forming the tank was completely torn away and that of the other engine folded over so as to crush to death the driver Richard Rigby and the fireman Herbert Royle. The three passenger carriages were thrown off the line with no loss of life. The wounded and dead, and the shattered carriages were removed from the line by men from the Hulton Colliery. Rigby had met with a fearful death, his head was forced between two iron plated which cut a deep gash nearly severing his head from the body. His face appeared scalded by the steam, as the flesh was partly gone and the bone laid bare. Royle the fireman also presented a sad spectacle. A young man named John Ramsdale, a coal filler of Bedford Leigh, was thrown from the engine of the goods train and sustained serious internal injuries from which he died soon after his removal to a cottage at Deane Lane. Thomas Gordon and George Shepherd were injured but not seriously, John Gerrard (the guard of the same train) was cut about the head and much shaken. One of the passengers W. F. Hulton of Hulton Park was injured about the back and head somewhat seriously. In the same first class compartment Ralph Fletcher colliery proprietor was also seriously hurt. A Mr. Markland of Beech Hall Farm Westhoughton was severely bruised about the head and sustained other minor injuries.Rigby aged 39 had a wife and four children, Royle was 18 and single and Ramsdale 19 and single. Rigby is the man who seven years ago was on an engine that ran into the end of the Great Moor Street Station at Bolton

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Collision Between two Tyldesley Trains July 1865 - On Wednesday morning last the unpunctuality, now so common with railway trains had a more serious result than usual. The London North West train which should leave Manchester Victoria station at 8 o'clock for Tyldesley was 7 minutes late for starting and the train from Tyldesley to Manchester at 8: 02 was 5 minutes late in arriving. The starting train was moving on the line by which the incoming train was approaching, and the result was a collision. The passengers were shaken, although from the slow rate at which the train was moving no one was much hurt. Several of the carriages and the engine sustained serious damage.

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Railway Accident at Tyldesley June 1865 - An accident of an alarming character, though happily unattended with serious results occurred at the junction near Tyldesley railway station. On Tuesday evening. The 6: 45 pm train from Tyldesley to Leigh had just left the station, and on arriving at the junction where the line to Leigh branches from the same line, the carriages by some means left the metals and narrowly escaped rolling down the steep embankment. Several of the passengers were much shaken, but there were no serious injuries.

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Fatal Railway Accident August 1865 - On Thursday evening the 7: 30 train from Wigan to Tyldesley and Manchester was approaching Platt Bridge station, a gang of labourers employed on the line, seeing the train approaching and anxious return home to Tyldesley by it, ran along the line to the station. One of them a young man named Michael Connell stepped right in front of the advancing train: he was knocked down and died instantly, his head being severed completely from his body. The remains were taken up and placed in the train and conveyed to Tyldesley, where the coroners inquest will be held

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Fatal Train Accident on the Tyldesley Line February 1866 - At 4:00 pm on Saturday 24th February an accident with attended loss of life occurred on the Tyldesley branch of the London North Western Railway near Eccles. Extending from Patricroft to Clifton and intersecting the Tyldesley line, is the Clifton branch. At 3: 40 pm the train from Manchester Victoria station to Tyldesley arrived safely at Eccles, stopped for passengers, and proceeded on its way. In the meantime a heavy goods train from Liverpool had occasion to shunt along the Clifton branch and over the crossing, but by oversight the shunting was done at the wrong time and in the very teeth of danger.It was just 4:00 pm when the driver of the Tyldesley train discovered that an accident was inevitable; indeed, owing to the sudden bend in the track he could not see the crossing until he was within a few yards. The signals all along the route justified his traveling at a rate of 15 to 20 mph and at the crossing the signal denoted safety. The goods train stretched across the Tyldesley route and was moving towards Clifton at a slow pace when the sight of an oncoming train startled the signalman. He changed the signal to show danger but to late to avoid an accident; fortunately at the moment of impact the Tyldesley carriages became uncoupled from the engine and the passengers were unhurt. The engine sped on bounding first against, and then upon the goods train, it dashed two or three wagons to splinters and then rolled with a fearful crash over the left side of the embankment and into the fields below, a distance of some 40 feet crushing the driver beneath it.A hasty search was made for him and he was found on the embankment among'st the engines coals. His left arm had nearly been torn off and a leg broken besides other injuries, he was nearly dead and they placed him on the 3:00 pm Liverpool train to Manchester, but expired in transit near Cross Lane. The dead driver was 27 year old Edward Sachfield of Hope Street, Salford, newly married with a dependent mother. The stoker on the Tyldesley train John Daniels was unhurt as he jumped off the engine moments before the collision.

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Fatality on the Railway at Westleigh February 1867 - On Tuesday evening John Holland an engine driver for the Wigan Coal & Iron Co.left the Railway Inn, and to shorten his journey home walked up the Bolton/Leigh railway where he was met with a luggage train and dreadfully injured. His wife who had been in search of him, had followed him a few minutes after he had gone up the line, and found him in a dying state. She immediately gave the alarm and he was conveyed to the house of Mr. Hindle, Victoria Inn, near the Kirkhall Lane crossing. Dr. Evans was sent for but he was dead before his arrival; having sustained severe internal as well as external injuries. Deceased when young lost one of his legs some coal wagons having passed over it. Since then notwithstanding his loss, he pursued a very active life, and was a very good mechanic. He always manufactured his own wooden legs. Strange to say, his final words when found by his wife, were words of lamentation for the loss of his wooden leg. Deceased had left a large family to mourn him

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Railway Fatality at Leigh 3 May 1867 - yesterday forenoon about 10am James Mullins aged 50 years was killed near Bedford Leigh station. Deceased yesterday arrived from Macclesfield on a visit to his daughter who resides in Noble Street, Bedford. Yesterday morning he walked up the line to visit his son in law Samuel Ha-cock who is pointsman, and was at the time in charge of the signal box on the line leading to Tyldesley. He slipped on the metals unconscious of the 9: 56 approaching train, which struck him with a frightful violence on the forehead, fracturing his skull in a frightful manner, of course killing him on the spot.  

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Kenyon Junction Train Crash 31 July 1868  - On Friday morning about 5 o'clock an accident similar to the disaster at Walton Junction occurred at Kenyon. The mail train to Manchester was turned into a siding and came into collision with a luggage train that was there standing.It appears that Ashton the signalman passed a goods train into the siding but carelessly left his points open while he left his box for a short time. Whilst below he lifted the weight which regulated the signal and the driver of the mail train proceeded without suspecting the impending danger. As soon as he perceived his train leaving the proper metals, he quickly reversed his engine and applied the brakes which very much reduced the force of the collision but his engine was stoved in and the latter part of the goods van which the engine ran into was one complete wreck, some of them broken up like matchwood. Fortunately the personal injuries are comparatively light/ Two of the passengers were much shaken and the guard Henry Evans was badly bruised. he was conveyed to the infirmary at Manchester. The poor fellow had previously been injured in a collision and has long carried marks of his injuries. The mail train was carried into Manchester after some delay, by the engine of the goods train. Yesterday a large number of staff were employed at Kenyon cleaning up the line.

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Accident at Atherton Station 1877. On Monday evening an accident occurred at Atherton Station to the passenger train that leaves Bolton at 8pm for Kenyon arriving at Atherton at 8.23pm. In descending the incline on the Bolton side of the station, it met a goods train coming out of the siding and a collision took place. The tender of the goods engine was damaged and the engine of the passenger train was disabled. The passenger train left the rails for about thirty yards. A number of the footboards attached to the carriages were also cut off, and the steps handles and windows broken. A delay of two to three hours occurred before traffic could be resumed. No complaints were made by the passengers, all of whom resumed their journey when the line had been cleared. As it is well known the line is single and worked by block and staff combined. The passenger train was duly signaled from Chequerbent, from which place to Atherton it descended a steep incline and as it approached the goods train, the speed being considerably, the driver of the goods train attempted to move out of the siding, as he started by order of the brakesman, which the latter denies.

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Accident at Tyldesley Station 1880. The Scotch express timed to go through Leigh Station at 8:20 pm ran into a portion of a goods train while on the main line, the driver was unable to draw up in time from what could have been a serious accident. The coal train, a special from Spring Branch arrived soon after 8:00 and was ordered by the the pointsman to draw it into the loop, instead, the brakesman unhooked nine wagons and the guards van leaving them on the main line. The wind was very strong and blew out the side lamps on the van, so the pointsman could not see the trucks; believing the line to be clear he signaled the express train to proceed. The express train could be seen arriving in the distance from the platform and a collision was inevitable. William Bull booking clerk seeing the danger ran out of the office and found three fog signals, two of which he managed to place on the line, but he had not time to place the third and had barely enough time to jump out of the way of the train. The driver hearing the signals shut off steam reversed lever and put on the brakes, the train was slowed down, but not enough to prevent it crashing into the coal trucks. Fortunately the train remained on the line or it would have fallen into Astley Street over the bridge. Many of the passengers were shaken, three being seriously injured.

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Railway Accident at Ben's Brew 1906 On the 22 January 1906 on the L& NW line between Atherton and Westleigh, owing to the fog and darkness, the driver of a goods train going in the direction of Bolton, failed to observe the lights on the level crossing gates, and dashed into it, smashing them to pieces. About a quarter of an hour later a goods train going in the opposite direction crashed into the wreckage, but did no damage and no one was hurt.

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