INDEX

Death of a Waterloo Hero

Death of Another Waterloo Hero

Death of a Veteran at Atherton

Death of a Veteran at Hindsford

Leigh Veteran Buried

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Death Of A Waterloo Hero

  On Thursday the portals of the tomb closed upon the mortal remains of James Ingham of Croft who died on the 26th May 1861, ripe with age and full of  honours. the internment took place at Winwick Church, and the solemn ceremony was attended by Mr. Baddeley of Kenyon Junction and other old warriors and intimate friends , who will cherish to their lives end the memory of a man whose brilliant exploits in the deafens of his native land have hitherto but been known within a very limited circle. Our hero just departed was a possessor of a Peninsular as well as a Waterloo medal. To the former 12 clasps were attached commemorative of his intrepid service in the following engagements:- Corruna, Albuera, Cuidad-Rodrego, Badajoz, Salamanca, Vittoria, Pamplona, Pyrenees, Neville, Nive, Orthes and Toulouse. He saw all this service as well as shared in the decisive victory at Waterloo as one of the 23rd Regiment Welsh Fusiliers - a regiment that has gained honours in more recent times that are entwined with those of which Sergeant Ingham was one of the last living representatives. One of the greatest of his many deeds of daring and danger was performed at the battle of Salamanca, when he was in the thickest of the fighting and close to  the regimental colours. One by one the officers whose duty it was to carry the ensign fell dead or wounded, and the duty of defending and preserving these precious treasures at length devolved upon Ingham.It did not however add to his embarrassment that the flag staff had been shot away,for binding the colours around his person was the only recourse left to him. The as if those sacred emblems, had imported to him a charmed existence , he succeeded in fighting his way from amongst the French soldiery, who were hemming him in on every side, and he faithfully kept the regimental standard from the defiling touch of exasperated foe men. Another act of gallantry of which he had a vivid and pleasing memory was carrying General Jackson off the battlefield when severely wounded and in great danger of dying from exhaustion. There are but few veterans now remaining to us who took so complete a part in Wellintons glorious achievement as Ingham the deceased, and few indeed will go to the grave at last more deeply and worthily lamented by many friends.

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Death Of Another Waterloo Hero

  Leigh Chronicle 19 April 1873 - Benjamin Baddeley an ex station master at Kenyon Junction and contemporary of James Ingham, died 12 April 1873 age 79 years he fought the battles of his country at Vittoria, Pyrenees, Nivelle, Nive, Orthes, Pampelona, Toulouse, Cambarey and Waterloo

WE HAVE to record this week the death of one more of the very few now living who, in the beginning of the present century, helped to overthrow the mightiest of conquerors - the great Napoleon - on the field of Waterloo. We refer to that much-respected townsman, Mr. Benjamin Baddeley who passed from amongst us on Saturday morning last at the age of 79. The life of this old veteran deserves to be recorded as a model that all young men entering into the world and all its troubles would do well to copy.He entered the British Army in the year 1812, and joined the 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers then operating in Spain under the command of the Duke of Wellington. He was present at all the great engagements fought under the commander until the close of the war in 1815, including the battles of Vittoria, Nive, Nivelle, Orthes, Toulouse, the Pyrenees, Waterloo and was also at the capture of Paris.After the Army of occupation had been withdrawn from France, Mr. Baddeley served in Gibraltar, the West Indies, and several of the British Colonies, until the year 1834, when he was discharged from the Army at his own request, on a pension, after a service of 23 years. He possessed the medals for the Peninsula campaigns, with clasps for the various actions, and a special medal conferred on him for the Battle of Waterloo.Some time after his discharge from the army Mr. Baddeley was appointed station-master at Bradshawleach, and afterwards removed to the larger and more important station of Kenyon Junction, where he served the company for nearly a quarter of a century. He was compelled to resign through age and failing health; his service was rewarded by a gratuity and a pension for life, and a gold medal was also subscribed for and presented to him by the public. Such was the eventful, honoured, and useful life of this brave soldier. He was buried on Tuesday last, the 15th instant, in Leigh cemetery; at the conclusion of the burial service Rev. Father White who officiated said that he had not only served his King and country in many a hard fought field, but also the Great King, whose banner was imperishable, and who had now taken him to himself to receive his reward.

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Death of a Veteran at Atherton

Death at Atherton  of a veteran of the Napoleonic War - William Farrington of Mealhouse Lane Atherton died on the 29 August 1864, the deceased was one of the oldest veterans in the district having reached the age of 83 years. He entered the service of his country in 1793 and was engaged in several sanguinary conflicts, which took place during the Peninsular War including Toulouse, Badajoz, Pyrenees, Cindad, Rodrego, Albuera, Coruna and others. At Badajoz he received a wound in his back, a shot passing through his knapsack and causing internal contusion, which affected him more or less all of his life. He lay among his wounded comrades for three days and nights, when he was discovered and removed to the hospital. The deceased was much respected by all who knew him, he was interned at Atherton cemetery his remains being followed by a large number of relatives and friends.

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Death of a Veteran at Hindsford

On the 28th August 1883 James Collier of Samuel Street, Hindsford was buried at Bedford cemetery, he was a native of Bedford and a soldier in the 83rd Regiment. He fought in the Peninsular War during which he was taken prisoner and held by the French for five years.

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 Leigh Veteran Buried

Sergeant James Hodge who had served his country for 22 years died at his residence in Newton Street, Leigh 18 August 1874 aged 64 years, he was born near Preston and enlisted in the Welsh Fusiliers at Blackburn in 1827. He served among other places in Spain, West Indies and Canada until 1849 when he was entered as a Pensioner at Chelsea Hospital with a pension of 1s 3p a day.

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